The partnership’s
VISION

In 2018 the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Danish Red Cross and Novo Nordisk formed a partnership to tackle the growing issue of NCDs affecting millions of people in humanitarian crises around the world.

The partnership is united by a collective vision that all people affected by humanitarian crises should have access to the NCD care they need, no matter where they are.

MOSUL, IRAQ

Civilians flee west Mosul as fighting between Iraqi forces and ISIS militants intensifies.

© DRC

TAHER ALI ABDU HIZAM,
YEMEN

“I have long suffered from diabetes”, says Mr. Taher. “My situation has however worsened during the current conflict due to the shortage of insulin in the country”, he adds.

© ICRC

Focus of the partnership
HYPERTENSION AND
DIABETES

Hypertension and diabetes affect 1.1 billion and 425 million people respectively – representing a large portion of the NCD public health burden.1,2 Diabetes and hypertension are closely related and are independently major risk factors for cardiovascular disease.3

The partnership will focus on these two conditions to assess opportunities to reduce risk-factors and provide care to people with NCDs in humanitarian crises.

To ensure solid data collection and evidence generation, the partnership will collaborate with academic partners led by the Health in Humanitarian Crises Centre at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).

The partnership’s
VISION

In 2018 the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Danish Red Cross and Novo Nordisk formed a partnership to tackle the growing issue of NCDs affecting millions of people in humanitarian crises around the world.

The partnership is united by a collective vision that all people affected by humanitarian crises should have access to the NCD care they need, no matter where they are.

MOSUL, IRAQ

Civilians flee west Mosul as fighting between Iraqi forces and ISIS militants intensifies. © DRC

© DRC

Focus of the partnership
HYPERTENSION AND
DIABETES

Hypertension and diabetes affect 1.1 billion and 425 million people respectively – representing a large portion of the NCD public health burden.1,2 Diabetes and hypertension are closely related and are independently major risk factors for cardiovascular disease.3

The partnership will focus on these two conditions to assess opportunities to reduce risk-factors and provide care to people with NCDs in humanitarian crises.

To ensure solid data collection and evidence generation, the partnership will collaborate with academic partners led by the Health in Humanitarian Crises Centre at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).

TAHER ALI ABDU HIZAM,
YEMEN

“I have long suffered from diabetes”, says Mr. Taher. “My situation has however worsened during the current conflict due to the shortage of insulin in the country”, he adds.

© ICRC

References

*View the sources for this page here

  1. Zhou B, Bentham J, Di Cesare M, et al. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015: a pooled analysis of 1479 population-based measurement studies with 19· 1 million participants. The Lancet. 2017;389(10064):37-55.
  2. International Diabetes Federation. IDF Diabetes Atlas, 8 ed. Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation;2017.
  3. Parving H-H, Hommel E, Mathiesen E, et al. Prevalence of microalbuminuria, arterial hypertension, retinopathy, and neuropathy in patients with insulin dependent diabetes. British medical journal (Clinical research ed). 1988;296(6616):156.

Components of the
PARTNERSHIP

needs assessment & analysis

Map and assess the current landscape to explore ways to reduce NCD risk factors and identify gaps in diabetes and hypertension care, as well as harness innovative approaches and technologies to optimise care in humanitarian crises.

equipment & supply management

Ensure availability of essential medicines relevant to diabetes, for example insulin, and hypertension care. Furthermore, ensure availability of basic equipment and supplies in health facilities.

development of field projects

Based on the outcome of the needs assessment, develop field projects to reduce risk factors for NCDs and improve care for people with diabetes and hypertension in humanitarian crises.

monitoring & evaluation

Enhance monitoring and evaluation strategies through data management and collection, as well as knowledge sharing and alignment with other key actors.

advocacy

Raise awareness about the importance of addressing NCDs in humanitarian crises at global, regional and local levels through joint advocacy efforts.

About the PARTNERS

ICRC Relief Partner

International Committee Of The Red Cross (ICRC)

For more information, visit icrc.org

Danish Red Cross Relief Partnership

Danish Red Cross (DRC)

For more information, visit rodekors.dk

Novo Nordisk

For more information, visit novonordisk.com

ICRC Relief Partnership

International Committee Of The Red Cross (ICRC)

For more information, visit icrc.org


International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

The ICRC helps people around the world affected by armed conflict and other situations of violence, doing everything possible to protect their dignity and relieve their suffering, often together with its Red Cross and Red Crescent partners. They also seek to prevent hardship by promoting and strengthening humanitarian law and universal humanitarian principles.

ICRC will contribute its expertise of humanitarian operations and response, especially on providing health care to vulnerable populations in fragile and violent settings. Together with the DRC and local partners, the ICRC will lead the implementation of demonstration projects on the ground including identifying people in need of treatment for diabetes and hypertension through the existing network of ICRC-supported health facilities.

Danish Red Cross Relief Partnership

Danish Red Cross (DRC)

For more information, visit rodekors.dk


Danish Red Cross (DRC)

The DRC supports vulnerable people to live safe and healthy lives in humanitarian and development settings as well as in Denmark. They equips people with the tools they need to strengthen their resilience. This organisations supports people on both sides of a conflict and in the remotest corners of the world with a special expertise in community-based health services.

The DRC will contribute its knowledge of community health outreach and capacity-building activities in humanitarian settings, with a focus on prevention and management of chronic diseases. It will facilitate access to nationwide networks of civil society groups, providing relevant services in their specific local contexts. It will mobilise staff and volunteers, including health professionals, with significant experience in humanitarian operations and response.

Novo Nordisk Relief Partnership

Novo Nordisk

For more information, visit novonordisk.com/humanitarianaction


Novo Nordisk

Novo Nordisk is a global healthcare company with 95 years of innovation and leadership in diabetes care. This heritage has given us experience and capabilities that also enable us to help people defeat obesity, haemophilia, growth disorders and other serious chronic conditions. Headquartered in Denmark, Novo Nordisk employs approximately 42,100 people in 79 countries and markets its products in more than 170 countries.

Novo Nordisk is building on its Access to Insulin Commitment to improve access to reliable and affordable supplies of insulin to people with diabetes living in humanitarian crises. Novo Nordisk is optimising and adapting its ordering and production procedures to better serve the needs of humanitarian organisations. This also includes sharing its knowledge of handling and distributing cold-chain products. It will share its wide experience of building capacity to improve access to diabetes care including supporting the development of education materials on diabetes prevention and care for a humanitarian context. The financial contribution to the partnership amounts to 21.5 million DKK for the period 2018–2020.

Lead academic partner

LSHTM & Centre for Global Chronic Conditions Relief Partnership

London School Of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

For more information, visit lshtm.ac.uk


London School Of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)

The Centre for Global Chronic Conditions aims to improve the understanding of and responses to chronic conditions in order to improve the health and health equity of people worldwide. We are a group of researchers from multiple disciplines (including epidemiology, economics, social political sciences, and health systems). We work in low-, middle- and high-income country settings, including vulnerable populations such as humanitarian crises and migrant populations.